View from Champithang dak bungalow

View from Champithang dak bungalow

2001.35.396.4.3 (Album Print black & white)

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Key Information

Photographer

Evan Yorke Nepean

Collection

Evan Yorke Nepean

Date of Photo

August 1st 1936

Region

Chumbi Valley Region > Champithang > Dak Bungalow

Accession number

2001.35.396.4.3

Image Dimensions

90 x 58 mm

View from Champithang dak bungalow en route to Lhasa in 1936. Low lying clouds fill the valley. Members of the Mission commented on the height of the tree-line at this point (14,000 ft) and the great variety of flowers

Further Information

Photographic Process

Negative film nitrate

Date Acquired

Loaned August 2002

Donated by

Judy Goldthorp

Expedition

British Diplomatic Mission to Lhasa 1936-37

Photo also owned by

Lady Nepean

This Image also appears in another collection

2001.35.5.1.1

Other Information

Notes on print/mount - 'View of clouds below Champitong Dak Bungalow'. [KC 24/07/2006]

Other Information - Description: Entry in Mission Diary for August 1st 1936: "Across the [Natu La] pass we were in Tibet and in an offshoot of the fertile and well watered Chumbi Valley. The tree line is very high, at nearly 14,000 feet, and the jungle here is a blaze of wild flowers. Chapman collected over a hundred varieties of flowers around Champithang Bungalow at over 13,000 feet. // We lunched
en route and reached the bungalow early in the afternoon" ['Lhasa Mission, 1936: Diary of Events', Part I p. 2, written by Neame] [MS 08/04/2006]

Manual Catalogues -

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For Citation use:
The Tibet Album. "View from Champithang dak bungalow" 05 Dec. 2006. The Pitt Rivers Museum. Accessed 25 Jul. 2014 <http://tibet.prm.ox.ac.uk/photo_2001.35.396.4.3.html>.

For more information about photographic usage or to order prints, please visit the The Pitt Rivers Museum.

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